Research orientations

Our staff members have various research interests. Below is a short description of the different research activities of our professors and their teams.

  • American Literature

    We are a dedicated group of teacher-scholars who enjoy preparing future high school teachers and aspiring academics in our field. Our course offerings reflect our areas of specialization including American poetry, Modernist women writers, and Southern and Western regional literature. We also offer classes in environmental, Native American, African American, and postcolonial studies. We see teaching and research as closely interconnected.

     

    We contribute to the international scope of American studies by regularly inviting guest lecturers, welcoming Fulbright visitors and writers as well as organizing international colloquia. Prof. Austenfeld, Dr. Ravi Allemann, and our doctoral students regularly present conference papers and publish in journals in our discipline. We encourage our students to study abroad and to write their BA or MA thesis on the subject that has most captivated their imagination. We emphasize creative thinking and analytical writing skills. If you are passionate about American Studies, we look forward to welcoming you.

  • Early Drama

    Professor Elisabeth Dutton heads the Early Drama at Oxford project, which looks at plays written and performed in Oxford Colleges between 1485 and 1642.  It is the first project to look at these plays, which comprise one of the most significant bodies of drama written and performed before the professional playhouses were built, and which continued parallel to the early professional playhouse drama (most notably Shakespeare, of course). EDOX researchers employ archival, literary and performance-based approaches in order to illuminate the nature of Oxford plays and their range of historical functions.  Our project has received funding from the British Academy, the John Fell Fund of the University of Oxford, and most recently from the Swiss National Science Foundation. In Prof. Dutton's graduate seminars, students can look at some of these plays, many of which have not been read, and certainly not staged, for centuries.

     

    Prof. Dutton is also Principal Investigator for the SNSF-funded project ‘Medieval Convent Drama’, working with Co-Investigator Dr Liv Robinson. This project explores important but academically neglected evidence of female performance in the medieval period: plays written and performed by nuns. This tradition existed in England but limited material survives: there is more evidence, including scripts, from France and the Low Countries, and the project examines this, and seeks new evidence, to illuminate the English medieval tradition. Plays are again studied and staged, with attention to the use of sacred space and song: performances will be held in the convents of Fribourg as well as in the UK. 

     

    Prof. Dutton also heads the multilingual Shakespeare project that gets students involved in translation, performance, backstage management, publicity.  The performances of ’Swiss Shakespeare' have been very popular and successful and students have performed in Fribourg, Lausanne (at the Lausanne Shakespeare Festival) and London, where they presented to great acclaim at Senate House, and at the King’s College, London, as part of the Shakespeare 400 Festival. Graduate students have also presented academic papers about multilingualism and Shakespeare at the European Shakespeare Research Association.  

     

    To sum up: perhaps the most distinctive thing Prof. Dutton and her team can offer to graduate students is the opportunity to work on the drama which happened before Shakespeare, and in institutions other than theatres during Shakespeare’s career — and to all students including undergraduates the opportunity to be involved in exploring early drama on the page but also in performance.  

  • Early Modern English Literature

    Our research encompasses fields as diverse as cultural history, intellectual history, authorship studies, and the history of the book, but what we share is a deep interest in the richness of literary texts and how they create meaning.

     

    In conjunction with early modern drama and poetry, we survey sources ranging from treatises of the court, jestbooks, religious tracts, to material texts.

     

    Prof. Indira Ghose is particularly curious about how apparently trivial aspects of life, such as humour and manners, have contributed to shaping modern identity. A crucial concern in her research is the way ideas and cultural practices have moved across historical, social and geographic space - from classical antiquity to the Renaissance, from Italy to early modern England, and from the marketplace of print to the stage.

     

    Dr. Emma Depledge’s research explores drama and poetry of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with a particular focus on authorship studies and on book and theatre history. She is particularly interested in the role agents of the book trade played in the presentation and promotion of early modern texts, writers and literary genres.

     

    Kilian Schindler is currently working on a dissertation on religion, persecution, and conformity in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama.

  • English Linguistics: PragLab (Pragmatics Lab)

    Looking at real English data drawn from a variety of sources, we specialise in the scientific study of meaning production and interpretation. Our scientific focus is on the cognitive processes involved in the elaboration of meaning in everyday uses of the English language(s).

     

    We are particularly interested in deceptive and persuasive communication. We also conduct research on the way people construct and evaluate arguments to negotiate standpoints, in the way they talk about space, or the way they use the language figuratively for instance in humorous exchanges. A further line of investigation looks at meaning elaboration in English as a foreign language (EFL).

     

    Our students learn how to build theories about linguistic processes involved in the calculation of meaning and they learn how to assess these theories experimentally through the systematic collection of empirical data using controlled experimental designs.

     

    Our expertise lies in the fields of pragmatics, semantics and argumentation theory / rhetoric and we combine experimental as well as discourse analytic approaches to evaluate our models against real English data.

  • Modern English Literature

    Any work of literature is a response to the social, political, and cultural climate of its time. The study of the particularly long and rich tradition of English literature enables us to identify lines of continuity and change within our cultural history. Treating the study of English literature as an end in itself rather than a means to an end, we focus on close reading of central works of English literature and offer contemporary perspectives on the legacy of major authors. We encourage our students to add their voice to the critical discussion.

     

    Our goal is to equip our students with the necessary tools for the analysis of literary texts and acquaint them with the relevant literary and historical contexts. We offer classes on a variety of genres and time periods ranging from Early modern drama, eighteenth-century literature, and Romantic poetry to Victorian and Modernist literatures and beyond. Prof. Dimiter Daphinoff's main research interests are in Shakespeare and his contemporaries, the eighteenth-century novel, the Gothic novel, twentieth-century drama, and the links between literature and terrorism.